RSS Feed

Tag Archives: running

Friday Night Run

The race, the marathon, is a renewal of belief in one’s self and the ultimate expression of confidence that you have created the foundation that enables you to go the distance.

Dolores E. Cross, Breaking Through the Wall

Every day gives you an opportunity to improve. With every run, you can try to be better. Not just a better runner, but a better person.

John “The Penguin” Bingham, The Courage to Start

One of my fav places to run in the city… Kelly Drive

Fav Blogs for Athletes!

http://www.fixyourrun.com/

John Goldthorp

As a Fitness Professional in Center City, Philadelphia, I have been changing lives for over ten years. I take my clients’ results very seriously and I am passionate about continuously learning and applying the latest research to my practice.

http://www.yoga4athletes.blogspot.com/

Lindsey Schweiger-Whalen
After I ran my first (and likely my only) marathon, I had chronic lower back pain coupled with IT Band Syndrome. It hurt to stand, sit, and sometimes even lie down. For 6 months, I worked with physical therapy and I didn’t run at all. Finally, I found yoga, relief from my physical suffering, and eventually, running once again. My experience with the body stems from my college studies in exercise science, an intensive yoga teacher training, years of personal training, and my own athletic pursuits. Over the years these have included baseball, softball, rock-climbing, running, swimming, volleyball, soccer, basketball, tennis and weight-lifting. I am passionate about yoga and its ability to help athletes prevent injury, recover from their sport, perform optimally and engage with the body compassionately.

Very very cool website, suggests running songs based on bpm!

http://cdn.abclocal.go.com/static/flash/embeddedPlayer/swf/otvEmLoader.swf?version=&station=wpvi&section=&mediaId=7997876&cdnRoot=http://cdn.abclocal.go.com&webRoot=http://abclocal.go.com&configPath=/util/&site=

There’s about 8 weeks left to train for the Blue Cross Broad Street Run. The 10-mile race was capped at 30,000 runners and it reached that capacity in just five days.

Running experts say, for many people, this is the time they get hurt.

So I met with a running coach at Optimal Sport Health Club. He has some tips to help keep everyone on track.

John Goldthorp is a certified running coach. He helps people run longer, get faster and avoid injuries.

I had him take me through a functional movement assessment. The movement tests joint mobility and stability.

He says stiff ankles, or weak feet or hips can lead to injury. And he has three tests and exercises you can do at home to help prevent problems.

The first is for ankle mobility. Place one foot three to four inches from the wall. Bend your knee in without lifting your heel. If you can do it, that’s a good sign. If not, then that becomes an exercise for each ankle every day.

“It’s best to do it several times a day, but definitely before you run,” says John Goldthorp.

The next test is the single leg squat.

“What we’re looking for with this one,” says Goldthorp, “is what are the knees doing?”

He says if your knee is caving in or wobbly, it is a sign your hips or feet are unstable. But once again, the test is also the exercise. Do this on each leg, eight repetitions, three times a day to strengthen your muscles.

The last is the marching bridge. As you raise one leg if your hips drop or twist that’s a sign of weak butt muscles. But again, the test is the fix.

Lastly, John says the biggest mistake runners make is doing too much too soon. You may feel good breathing wise, so you up your mileage.

“But the next thing you know, you feel an ache in your knee or foot because your muscle, tendons and ligaments take longer to adapt,” says Goldthorp.

“You just have to be patient, you can do it and I’d love for you to do it, you just have to take your time,” explains Goldthorp.

John says don’t rush your training. Take your time.

Training Tips from running coach John Goldthorp at Optimal Sports Health Club.

The first is for ankle mobility: Place one foot three to four inches from the wall. Bend your knee in to the wall without lifting your heel. If you can do this, that’s a good sign. If not, this becomes your exercise, each ankle every day. Goldthorp says to do eight repetitions three times a day (especially before running.) And even if you can do the exercise out of the gate, it’s still a good way to keep ankles loose.

The next exercise is a single leg squat: On one leg, squat halfway down. If your knee is caving in or wobbly, it’s a sign your hips or feet are unstable. But once again, Goldthorp says the test is also the exercise. Do this on each leg, eight repetitions three times a day to strengthen your muscles.

The last is the marching bridge: Lay on your back and lift your hips and buttocks up. Raise one leg. If your hips drop or twist that’s a sign of weak butt muscles, but again the test is the fix. Do this exercise same as the others, eight repetitions, three times a day.

Again, John says the biggest mistake runners make is doing too much too soon. Be patient, you can do it, just have to take your time.

For more tips or for a training schedule, visit: fixyourrun.com

%d bloggers like this: